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Wait, nerves can get tight just like muscles? PART 2

Updated: Aug 19, 2023

As promised, here are some examples of upper extremity nerve glides:




upper extremity nerve glides


-Median nerve glide: The median nerve arises from the lateral and medial cords of the brachial plexus (located near where your neck meets your shoulder) and travels all the way down your arm into your hand, providing both motor and sensory innervation to your forearm, wrist, and hand. To perform a median nerve glide, begin with your symptomatic arm out to the side, elbow straight and palm up. Gently alternate between bending your wrist down as you bring your ear to your shoulder and bending your wrist up as you bring the opposite ear to the opposite shoulder.






radial nerve glide



-Radial nerve glide: The radial nerve arises from the posterior cord of the brachial plexus and travels down the back of your arm and goes to the back of your forearm prior to splitting into superficial and deep branches. This nerve has multiple sensory and motor functions along the posterior muscles of the arm, forearm, and hand. To gently mobilize the radial nerve, begin with your symptomatic arm down by your side, elbow straight and palm back with fingers curled in. Bring arm back and wrist up as you bring your ear to your shoulder.







ulnar nerve glide





-Ulnar nerve glide: The ulnar nerve arises from the medial cord of the brachial plexus and travels to provide motor and sensory innervation to the inner forearm and hand. For an ulnar nerve glide, begin with symptomatic arm out to your side, elbow bent and palm facing you. Gently move wrist down as you bring your opposite ear to the opposite shoulder. Stabilize your shoulder with your opposite hand to prevent it from hiking up.








Note: this is not intended to be medical advice. Always consult with your local PT prior to beginning a new exercise program.

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